In the Face of Fear: Buddhist Wisdom for Challenging Times - Barry Boyce When people ask me what religion I am, I'm usually at a loss for words.I do not believe in God, at least not a sentient one, so most people think I am an atheist or an agnostic. But that doesn't fit either. Although I do not believe in God, I believe that mystery we call Being is meshed with everything around us. I believe there is a spirituality in nature and people that is measurable and observable. (I was pleasantly surprised to hear Sam Harris say something similar in his book End of Faith and that he had some nice things to say about Buddhism.)

While I do not subscribe to any religion, philosophically I am Buddhist. Its tenets are not interested in describing a pie in the sky afterlife nor is it worried about science disproving it. Its belief are focused on living life in the fullest way we can. [b:In the Face of Fear Buddhist Wisdom for Challenging Times|6707562|In the Face of Fear Buddhist Wisdom for Challenging Times|Barry Boyce|http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41X7HTTjQQL._SL75_.jpg|6903385] is a collection of essays from some of the most important Buddhist commentators on living a full life in our troubled times. These essays are recent articles that were written during the current recession so they are placing their ideas firmly in front of what troubles us today. The ideas and techniques in the book are simple but perhaps not that easy to master as we hold tenaciously on to our own ideas of what is tragic and what is suffering. Of course meditation, the Four Nobel Truths and other ideas are described yet I think this book was mainly written for the novice and more experienced practitoners, not for the total beginner. If you are not familiar with the main ideas you might want to get a basic primer on Buddhism first. However, this is a font of information and a inspiring book for both the novice and the advanced student of Buddhism.